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Week 22: Let's talk about PUPPP

I recently found out that I won the skin rash lottery by being the one in 200 pregnancies that is awarded PUPPP (pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy—whew!). Call me lucky, but having a summer pregnancy, a baby already positioned so low it could peek out and say hi, topped with an itchy (and...

I recently found out that I won the skin rash lottery by being the one in 200 pregnancies that is awarded PUPPP (pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy—whew!). Call me lucky, but having a summer pregnancy, a baby already positioned so low it could peek out and say hi, topped with an itchy (and equally annoying) but totally harmless rash is pretty awesome—crossing this off the bucket list y’all.

week22-ChristineKULike pretty much everything in pregnancy, no one knows what causes this. It’s amazing to me that we know so much about pregnancy when so much is unknown:

Why am I bleeding? We don’t know.
Why am I cramping? We don’t know.
Was that my mucous plug? We don’t know.

Most times guesses aren’t even right. For example:

1. PUPPP usually appears in the 3rd trimester. (Mine debuted in the second.)
2. PUPPP is most common with first-time pregnancies. (This is my third pregnancy.)
3. PUPPP most common with carrying multiples. (Author fact: There is only ONE baby in me.) 

I’m thankful it’s an extremelymild case. At first I was really annoyed, but then I Googled some images and stopped complaining almost immediately. Sadly there isn’t a cure, or a preventative measure, so what do you do for relief?

  • Oatmeal bath
  • Scratch
  • Baking soda
  • Have your cat scratch
  • Cold cloth
  • Aloe Vera gel
  • Anti-itching creams
  • Sand Paper

I’ve been using Eucerin’s Aquaphor Baby Healing Ointment—the ginormous container because:

A. I love Eucerin and should be buying stock.
B. I underestimated the actual size of my stomach.
C. Both A and B, but mostly B.

This ointment is a clear gel that pretty much looks like it came out of a snail’s backside. It stains clothes, it’s greasy, and it sticks to shirts like pureed peas. After about a week of using it twice a day, I noticed the red went away and most of the itching stopped. Lulled into a false sense of security, I quit using the ointment, only to be plagued with it again less than a week later. So, I’ve accepted that this, along with taking two Tums a day and wearing a lot of panty liners, has just become life for 17 more weeks.

As an interesting side note, some studies show that PUPPP is more frequent in women carrying boys. Of course, no formal research has been done so—all together now: no one really knows. Essentially, this theory is the product of several coincidences and guesses. 70 percent of which indicate that PUPPP sufferers deliver boys. Some “guessers” believe it has to do with male DNA interacting with the mother’s body causing irritation–isn’t it just like a dude to get under a woman’s skin for the sole sake of irritation? Coincidence or not, I fall into that 70 percent. Our technician “guesses” we’re having a baby boy. So, unless the umbilical cord is placed much, much, much too low and comes equipped with two little storage bags, I’d have to say that I’m 99.9 percent sure they’re right.

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