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Handy how-to: Feel comfortable in your new role

Handy how-to: Feel comfortable in your new role

Whether your postpartum body has you feeling flustered or a crying baby and lack of sleep have you wondering if you’re cut out for this whole motherhood thing, follow these steps to restore your self-confidence. Pinpoint the issue. By identifying what’s making you uneasy, you can open yourself up to acceptance. “The first step is...

Whether your postpartum body has you feeling flustered or a crying baby and lack of sleep have you wondering if you’re cut out for this whole motherhood thing, follow these steps to restore your self-confidence.
comfortable-skin-2Pinpoint the issue.
By identifying what’s making you uneasy, you can open yourself up to acceptance. “The first step is accepting your discomfort, making it OK, and beginning the process of working on it,” says Steven Walker, PsyD, a psychologist in Tampa, Florida. For example, many mothers struggle postpartum when they realize that having a newborn is much harder than they had anticipated. By recognizing that parenthood is a challenge, moms can be more forgiving of themselves when feelings of defeat or exhaustion surface.
Keep tabs on yourself.
Make a point to have a weekly check-in with yourself. Ask where your head is currently, where it’s been in the past week, and where you’d like it to go. By being aware of your mental state, you can start feeling a little less uneasy and a lot more like your true self.
Talk it out.
Sorting through unresolved issues and correcting them can bring you closer to achieving peace within. Find the right person, whether a friend or professional, to confide in and go from there. According to Walker, “Preventative psychological care can not only intervene before emotional problems become acute, but it can also provide valuable tools and information to help you better adjust to the life challenges we all face.”
Know you’re not alone.
It’s important to acknowledge that these feelings of uncertainty that plague so many mothers (and fathers) are normal. We all have to take a step back to reassess and regroup regularly. It’s intimidating to face our hang-ups head on, but it’s the best thing we can do for ourselves (and our babies).