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Excuse me please

Take it in As infants gulp milk from bottle or breast, they tend to swallow air right along with it, which can lead to discomfort and sometimes spitting up. “This is exacerbated by the fact that babies spend so much time on their backs, making it difficult for air bubbles to escape,” explains Terri  McFadden-Garden,...

burpingbabyTake it in
As infants gulp milk from bottle or breast, they tend to swallow air right along with it, which can lead to discomfort and sometimes spitting up. “This is exacerbated by the fact that babies spend so much time on their backs, making it difficult for air bubbles to escape,” explains Terri  McFadden-Garden, MD, pediatrician with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.
Let it out
“Most bottle-fed infants should be burped mid-feeding and after completion of the feeding,” advises McFadden-Garden, adding that babies with reflux may need to be burped more frequently. Breastfed babies should be burped when switching sides—although it’s possible that burping won’t be necessary because they tend to take in less air.
Give it time
Every once in a while, you’re likely to encounter a belch that refuses to budge. “Sometimes the sound of the burp may be so subtle that parents miss it,” says McFadden-Garden. Or it could be that baby didn’t take in much air during the feeding. “Be patient, and give baby time to burp in the upright position,” she encourages. “If a baby hasn’t burped in 5-10 minutes and is showing no signs of discomfort, it’s OK to move on to the next part of the routine.”